ABOUT THE PROJECT

The Heritage Communities Local Growth Planning project includes the communities of: Eagle Ridge, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, Fairview, Haysboro, Acadia, Southwood, Willow Park, Maple Ridge and Chinook Park.

Through the local growth planning process, we’ll work together to create a future vision for how land could be used and redeveloped in the area – building on the vision, goals and policies outlined in Calgary’s Municipal Development Plan and the Developed Areas Guidebook.

Why is this happening?

Communities change and evolve over the years. Buildings gain character, community demographics change, trees mature, local amenities and businesses change ownership and offerings. A big part of a community’s life cycle is redevelopment, which often begins when communities reach a certain age and homes, buildings and amenities need to be refreshed and revitalized or renewed and replaced.

Looking more broadly, across the whole city, we need to consider where and how growth and development should happen. We need to consider the sustainability and our city’s urban footprint, we need to ensure existing infrastructure can be maintained and amenities and facilities in established neighbourhoods have the population needed to support them to ensure they continue to thrive. We also need to balance the need to grow and develop with the need to retain and enhance the unique character of our neighbourhoods, historical resources and the natural environment.

What is local growth planning?

Through local growth planning, we look at the fabric of a specific local area, the community’s vision for the evolution of the area, the ideal places to accommodate growth, and how to make the best use of limited land – balancing the need to increase density, improve mobility and enhance places and spaces to live, work and play.

Increased growth and redevelopment is anticipated in the communities of Eagle Ridge, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, Fairview, Haysboro, Acadia, Southwood, Willow Park, Maple Ridge and Chinook Park over the next few decades.

Working together, we will create a local area plan to help guide growth and redevelopment in a way that integrates and enhances existing community character and ensures the area is vibrant and thriving in the future.

WHAT COMMUNITIES ARE INVOLVED & WHY?

The Heritage Communities Local Growth Planning project is one of the 42 multi-communities areas in the city. This project includes the communities of: Eagle Ridge, Kelvin Grove, Kingsland, Fairview, Haysboro, Acadia, Southwood, Willow Park, Maple Ridge and Chinook Park.

Through the local growth planning process, we’ll work together to create a future vision for how land could be used and redeveloped in the area – building on the vision, goals and policies outlined in Calgary’s Municipal Development Plan and the Developed Areas Guidebook.

A new local area plan will fill gaps in communities/areas where no local plan currently exists and replace other plans that are largely outdated. In this project context, the local area plan will cover multiple communities and will be adopted by Council as an Area Redevelopment Plan.

Currently, the Heritage Communities area has five local policy documents, each covering different portions of the area. These documents were originally created between 1980 and 2017 including:

*(date in brackets indicates year of original adoption or when an entire new version was adopted)

Updating, consolidating or rescinding policies in the above plans will provide a more comprehensive picture of where growth should occur in the future. This is particularly important for key growth areas such as our Main Streets and primary transit corridors such as the Red Line and BRT, in the area. Identifying local growth opportunities along these corridors and within communities is important in order to support existing schools facing declining enrollment, retain and expand the variety of commercial and retail services and support recent and future investment in transit infrastructure.

BACKGROUND INFO

What is a local area plan?

A local area plan is a plan that provides local-specific direction to indicate and guide where growth and change should happen within a specific local area. Throughout The City these exist as statutory and non-statutory plans and include but are not limited to: Area Redevelopment Plans, Area Structure Plans, Station Area Plans, Design Briefs, Land Use Studies etc.

For those wanting to do further reading, here are some helpful background documents on the project, City planning processes and/or growth and redevelopment. As the project progresses, this library will be added to.

Background handouts:

Background videos:

Background maps:

Other projects in the Heritage Communities Area:

City-led projects (past & current):

Community-led projects:



GET INVOLVED

  • Learn more about why developed communities need to evolve, how growth and redevelopment is managed and why local area plans are important – DISCOVER and learn more now.
  • Share your ideas starting September 17, 2019. Click the ENVISION button below for more info about our first phase of engagement - kicking off soon!
  • Stay connected by subscribing to receive information about upcoming engagement opportunities and key project updates.



There will be multiple opportunities to get involved and provide input within each phase. Learn more about who can get involved and how public input will be used by clicking on the tabs below.

Opportunities to get involved online will be linked below and details about event in the community will be shared in the "Key Dates" section on this page.

WHO CAN GET INVOLVED?

Anyone who is interested in the project can get involved. This includes anyone who lives, works or visits in the area, anyone who owns property or land, anyone who is considering opening a business in the area or proposing a new building or development in the area.

Having a broad range of participants and input will help ensure a variety of perspectives are considered in the development of the local area plan.

HOW WILL PUBLIC INPUT BE USED?

The City defines engagement as:

Your input, and the input of other citizens and stakeholders, helps City decision makers understand people’s perspectives, opinions, and concerns. Input collected in each phase of the project will be compiled and share through a What We Heard report.

Decision makers will consider public input and aim to demonstrate how input has influenced decisions or if decisions were not influenced by public input, explain why.

Although it would be a great outcome, the goal of public engagement is not to reach consensus or make everyone happy. Public engagement is also not about voting or collecting representative information. Public engagement is about considering the input, ideas and perspectives of people who are interested or impacted by decisions, before decisions are made.

Public input is an important part of local area planning, but is one of many areas of consideration in the decision-making process.

Who makes the final decision?

Council is the ultimate decision maker on the local area plan. City Administration will make a recommendation to Council and the local area plan will be adopted by Council through a Public Hearing of Council. Members of the public are invited to address Council and speak at the Public Hearing. When a Public hearing is scheduled details will be made available on this site.