UPDATE

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INPUT!

Opportunities for input in this phase were open June 6 - 30, 2022, but are now closed.

A What We Heard report, outlining all feedback captured through online feedback and other feedback opportunities in this phase, will be shared in Fall 2022.

Thanks again to everyone who took the time to get involved in this phase. We're looking forward to connecting with you again soon. Sign up for email updates to stay connected and learn about the next steps.



Help Plan Your Community’s Future


Growth and development will happen with or without a Local Area Plan. We need your input today to help shape your community’s tomorrow.

Topic 1: Small-Scale Homes

We’ve heard from the community that small-scale homes are an important topic. We’re looking for your input to inform development direction on this topic.

Topic 2: Draft Urban Form & Building Scale Maps

We started the conversation about focus areas for growth and change in the last phase. We’ve created updated draft maps further outlining where and how growth and change could happen in the area. Take a look and provide feedback on the draft maps.

Topic 3: Investment Priorities

Let’s discuss priority projects that, when implemented, can help support this growth. This could include projects such as playground enhancement, pedestrian improvements and new bikeway/pathway connections. If you have additional ideas, let us know!


Click each topic, review the info, submit your feedback!

Topic 1: Small-Scale Homes


We’ve heard from the community that small-scale homes are an important topic. Information on small-scale homes is included below to support this conversation.

What's a small-scale home?

A small-scale home is any home that is three storeys or less containing one or more units with individual exterior entrances. Small-scale homes include single-detached homes, semi-detached homes, duplexes, rowhouses, triplexes, fourplexes, and other forms that share those same characteristics. Basement or backyard suites could be included in all small-scale housing forms except triplexes and fourplexes.


Different forms of small-scale homes are described and shown below (click to expand):

Single-detached homes

(based on the Land Use Bylaw Rules)

◾ Contain one primary residence and may include a backyard or basement suite.

◾ Can be different scales including one storey (bungalow), two or three storeys.

◾ The general lot coverage is 45% and the maximum height is 10 metres.

One storey single-detached (bungalow)


Two storey single-detached


Three storey single-detached


Semi-detached and duplexes homes

(based on the Land Use Bylaw Rules)

◾ Contain two primary residences in one building and may include a basement suite or backyard suite for each primary residence.

◾ Residences in semi-detached dwellings are separated from each other side to side, and duplexes are separated above and below.

◾ Can be different scales including one storey (bungalow), two or three storeys.

◾ The general lot coverage is 45% and the maximum height is 10 metres. This makes the massing generally similar to a single-detached home.


Two storey semi-detached

Two storey semi-detached

Three storey semi-detached


Rowhouses

(based on the Land Use Bylaw Rules)

◾ Contain three or more residences on a property and may include a basement suite or backyard suite for each primary residence.

◾ Typically have up to 60% lot coverage and up to three storeys in height (11 metres).

◾ Rowhouses require that units face the street.


Two-storey rowhouse

Two-storey rowhouse

Three-storey rowhouse

Triplexes and fourplexes

(based on the Land Use Bylaw Rules)

◾ Contain three or more primary residences (suites are not permitted).

◾ Residences not required to have front entrance facing the street.

◾ Typically have up to 60% lot coverage and can be up to three storeys in height (11 metres).

◾ Residences are separated from each other side to side and/or top to bottom.

Two storey fourplex

Two storey fourplex

Two storey fourplex


Having a Variety of Small-Scale Homes Has Many Benefits for a Community

Population stabilization and growth: Communities that have more housing choices have seen their populations stabilize or gradually increase which supports local businesses, schools, recreation facilities and community reinvestment.

Housing choice: One size doesn’t fit all. Having a variety of homes to choose from attracts people of different ages and family compositions, creating vibrant communities.

Supporting changing life needs: Having more housing options provides the opportunity to live and remain in the same community close to friends, family and the things we know and enjoy, as our housing needs change over our lifetime.


 Image of same sex family with quote: “We pride ourselves that we have a spacious yard where our kids can actually run around outside and play hide and go seek however, we would welcome greater density. We appreciate that our homes look different from eac
“If we do nothing to redevelop the community we will eventually have to drive just to buy a loaf of bread. We need a broader mix of residence types, to allow people of all demographics (students, singles, families, seniors) to live in the area.” — CITIZEN

How a Street Could Evolve Over the Next 30+ Years

There is a stage in each community’s life cycle when the choice to rebuild or redevelop homes and buildings becomes more and more frequent (generally as homes and buildings reach 50+ years). Let’s take a look at what the evolution of a residential street could look like as people choose to build or move to new homes in established communities where homes have been rebuilt.

1. Established community street (built in 1960) - all bungalows. 2. Established community street (partially redeveloped 50 to 70 years later with only single-detached homes). 3. Established community street (partially redeveloped 50 to 70 years later with

Let’s Talk About Small-Scale Homes

Direction for single-detached and semi-detached homes

To start the discussion, below is the draft direction for small-scale homes in the Heritage Communities:

Single-detached homes (up to three storeys) are already allowed throughout residential areas in Calgary. As duplexes and semi-detached homes have similar height and lot coverage to single-detached homes, we are proposing that these are supported throughout the Heritage Communities.


We’re looking for your input to inform the direction on small-scale homes with 3 or more units

Homes with 3 or more units, such as rowhouses, triplexes and fourplexes homes permit a greater lot coverage and unit number than single-detached, semi-detached and duplex homes. As all small-scale homes have a similar maximum potential height (up to three storeys), all small-scale housing types are seen as being compatible.

Where do you think small-scale 3+ unit homes could be welcomed? A few potential areas for consideration are outlined below.



TOPIC 1: PROVIDE YOUR INPUT

Your input and the input of others will help inform development direction for small-scale homes in the Heritage Communities. Local area plans help guide decisions about development if/when proposals are brought forward by property and landowners in area.


Topic 2: Draft Maps


Growth and Development Will Happen With or Without a Local Area Plan

All property/landowners have the right to propose changes to their land. New homes and buildings are proposed in response to people’s changing wants and needs. When development is proposed, a Local Area Plan provides direction on what makes sense where and provides property/landowners, residents, City planners and Council with direction to inform development decisions.

A Local Area Plan aims to balance the need to provide flexibility for people looking to make changes, certainty for existing residents and direction when development proposals are brought forward.



What We've Heard So Far

We started the conversation about focus areas for growth (buildings four storeys or greater) and change in the last phase of engagement. Themes we explored were, Macleod Trail and Community Corridors, as well as Transit Station Areas and Neighbourhood Activity Centres (Nodes). We also explored two industrial areas: Haysboro Industrial Area and portions of Fairview Industrial Area.

The feedback received informed the draft maps as follows:

  • Four storeys was suggested as a suitable height along Community Corridors. Six or 12 storeys along these corridors was not supported.
  • More intense growth and taller buildings were generally supported along Macleod Trail S and Transit Station Areas.
  • Heritage Drive S should be considered a Community Corridor or an area suitable for moderate to large growth.
  • Haysboro Industrial and portions of Fairview Industrial were confirmed as areas where limited non-industrial uses could be considered as well as we heard people would like to see these areas become more vibrant, active and safer.

See the full Phase 2 What We Heard report for additional information.


You will see that we’ve made changes or confirmed we were on the right track in response to the feedback received in Phase 2, for example:

  • The maximum height along Community Corridors is proposed as four storeys. A low-modified scale modifier has been used to support this height.
  • Macleod Trail S and Transit Station Areas are considered for development beyond 12 storeys. Due to lot configuration some limitations exist around the Anderson Transit Station Area and development in those areas is proposed to be up to four storeys.
  • Heritage Drive S is identified as a key east-west street and where feasible moderate to large growth is proposed.
  • Haysboro Industrial Area and portions of Fairview Industrial will continue to support light industrial uses; however, to support the feedback received a Special Policy Area overlay has been applied for those areas to allow for limited nonindustrial uses and support an enhanced public realm.

“In my opinion, the large-scale developments should be limited to the stations and nodes where commercial developments already exist.” —CITIZEN “The transit stations are the best locations for multi-density developments (4-26 storeys).” —CITIZEN


Draft Local Area Plan Maps

There are two maps in a Local Area Plan that outline what type and scale of development makes sense where:

Map 1: Draft Urban Form Map

The Draft Urban Form Map details the types of uses proposed for different areas. These can include primarily commercial areas, primarily residential areas and parks and open space.

Map 2: Draft Building Scale Map

The Draft Building Scale Map details the allowable height and building mass for different areas. The various scale categories contain policies that outline both building heights and also other design considerations such as step backs (where higher floors are set back from lower floors).


Take a look at the draft maps below. These draft maps have not been finalized and we are looking for your input.

Draft Urban Form: Draft Building Scale:

Urban Form & Building Scale Legend

(includes descriptions of each category shown on the map)


View the Draft Urban Form Map and Draft Building Scale Map in a PDF format if you'd prefer.

The Urban Form and Building Scale Legend (which includes descriptions of each category) is also available in PDF format.

These draft maps can also be found in the revised draft Chapter 2 local area plan content, along with supporting draft development direction (policies).



TOPIC 2: PROVIDE YOUR INPUT

Your input and the input of others will help inform refinements to draft Chapter 2 of the local area plan (including the draft Urban Form and Building Scale Maps, and supporting policies). Local area plans help guide decisions about development if/when proposals are brought forward by property and landowners in area.

Topic 3: Investment Priorities


Core Values and Investment Priorities

Let's chat about the kinds of improvements and changes will help support new growth and improve neighbourhood amenities in these communities.

To help frame this discussion, we will refer back to our core values.


Core ValuesInvestment Priorities

◾ Provide spaces for people to sit, gather, enjoy and walk along Community Corridors and in Neighbourhood Activity Centres. ◾ Incorporate public art and other streetscape elements. ◾ Explore opportunities to creating multi-purpose and multiuse amenities.

Build on the Uniqueness of the Heritage Communities


◾ Provide spaces for people to sit, gather, enjoy and walk along Community Corridors and in Neighbourhood Activity Centres.

◾ Incorporate public art and other streetscape elements.

◾ Explore opportunities to creating multi-purpose and multiuse amenities.


Improve Connectivity Between Communities

◾ Explore opportunities to complete east-west pedestrian and cycling connections.

◾ Complete missing links and realign cycling and pedestrian infrastructure.

◾ Improve pedestrian crossings at key intersections.


Enhance Macleod Trail S



◾ Undertake the Macleod Trail S Streetscape Master Plan to support a comfortable, accessible and safe public realm.

◾ Improve the pedestrian experience along Macleod Trail S.


Foster Vibrant Transit Station Areas


◾ Encourage improvements to public spaces in Transit Station Areas.

◾ Explore opportunities for a new infill LRT station in the Fairview Industrial area.

Promote Inclusive and Accessible Housing Choices



◾ Incentivize the inclusion of affordable and accessible housing in development.

◾ Explore opportunities to connect, enhance and expand the park and open space network. ◾ Consider efforts to expand the urban forest in residential areas. ◾ Improve existing Reservoir and river accesses and connectivity to these areas.
Enhance Open Space

◾ Explore opportunities to connect, enhance and expand the park and open space network.

◾ Consider efforts to expand the urban forest in residential areas.

◾ Improve existing Reservoir and river accesses and connectivity to these areas.

◾ Support limited non-industrial uses, including certain residential uses such as work-live units, in Haysboro and portions of Fairview Industrial areas. ◾ Encourage interface improvements when located near residential or commercial areas.

Support Industrial and Commercial Vitality

◾ Support limited non-industrial uses, including certain residential uses such as work-live units, in Haysboro and portions of Fairview Industrial areas.

◾ Encourage interface improvements when located near residential or commercial areas.

◾ Explore the feasibility of renewable energy generation and district energy systems, low impact development, green infrastructure and integrated water management in the plan area. ◾ Incentivize green infrastructure and landscaping including naturalization projects and xeriscape initiatives on public and private sites.

Enable Resiliency



◾ Explore the feasibility of renewable energy generation and district energy systems, low impact development, green infrastructure and integrated water management in the plan area.

◾ Incentivize green infrastructure and landscaping including naturalization projects and xeriscape initiatives on public and private sites.


Additional investment priority details can be found in draft Chapter 3 of the local area plan. Let us know if you have additional ideas for local investment below.


“Include more benches along the way. Seniors like to get out and walk but need to rest along the way…..as I am sure others do also. It is all about aging in place.”


TOPIC 3: PROVIDE YOUR INPUT

Your input and the input of others will help inform refinements to draft Chapter 3 of the local area plan (including priorities for investment in the Heritage Communities). Priority investments and options are identified in the Local Area Plan, but do not have associated funding. Investment priorities may be implemented by various groups including The City, developers, communities, etc. in connection with redevelopment or if/when funding becomes available.


Stay connected to the project. Subscribe to receive updates on what was heard and how input was used to refine the plan. You can unsubscribe at anytime.


If you did not receive an engagement booklet in the mail, you can pick one up at a My Idea Station, check out the digital version (link above) or provide your input through the online survey.


My Idea Stations have been placed throughout the Heritage Communities area. These will be used throughout the project to share information. Find a My Idea Station near you.