PHASE THREE: EVALUATE

In Phase 3 [EVALUATE] we are sharing the draft local area plan and looking to gather feedback to help evaluate and refine the final proposed plan.

The draft North Hill Communities Local Area Plan is informed by the proposed Guidebook for Great Communities. To learn more about the Guidebook, please click here.

Engagement on the draft plan is open from November 25 through December 8.

Please review the information below and share your thoughts online or attend one of our in-person events. Check out the schedule of events listed in the side-bar for more information.

To review the information panels from the in-person sessions, please click here (1 of 2) and click here (2 of 2). Content from the information panels has also been broken out in the tabs below.

LEARN MORE

Haven't had a chance to review the previous project details yet? Please ensure that you return to the PROJECT MAIN PAGE or the DISCOVER PAGE to get up-to-speed on what we have been up to over the past year.


WHAT?

What is a Local Area Plan?

A local area plan identifies and guides where and how future growth and development should happen within a specific area. It is a statutory document that will be adopted by Council.

A local area plan includes these components:

  • VISUALIZING GROWTH - What type of growth makes sense where? (vision & maps)
  • ENABLING GROWTH - What local/custom direction is needed to realize great redevelopments in this area? (development policies)
  • SUPPORTING GROWTH - If growth occurs, what physical and social investments are needed? (future infrastructure & amenity goals)

A new local area plan will fill gaps in communities where no local plan currently exists and will replace other plans that are largely outdated.


What guides growth and redevelopment?

Local area plans are one of many strategic tools in our planning system that work together to create great communities for everyone. The tools in our planning system are used to achieve desired outcomes as planning moves from vision to outcome.

WHY?

Why is a Local Area Plan needed?

Local area plans provide guidance and direction as communities reach their natural redevelopment lifecycle stage and outline how communities can continue to evolve to meet people’s needs and remain places that people love and want to live.

THE LIFE CYCLE OF A NEIGHBOURHOOD

A big part of a community’s life cycle is redevelopment, which often begins when communities reach a certain age and homes, buildings and amenities need to be refreshed and revitalized or renewed and replaced.

COMMUNITIES MUST EVOLVE TO MEET PEOPLE’S CHANGING NEEDS AND PREFERENCES

People’s needs and preferences have changed over the past 50 years and they will continue to change over the next 50 years.

Census data shows that, today, proportionally fewer households are composed of a ‘two parent and kids’ family and more people are living alone, as part of a couple without children, or as part of a multigenerational family. One-person households accounted for 28.2% of all households in 2016, the highest share since 1867.

Nationally, one-person households became the most common type of household for the first time in 2016, surpassing couples with children, which were down from 31.5% of all households in 2001 to 26.5% in 2016. In comparison, the percentage of one-person households was 25.7% in 2001. Since 1951, the percentage of households comprised of just one person increased steadily, from 7.4% to 28.2% in 2016.

In the neighbourhoods of the North Hill Communities the overall population is below the peak and the occupancy rate, number of persons in a home, is lowering and the variety of housing forms is changing. Current 2018 population is 49,317, not much below the peak total, but different communities vary significantly. 2018 average occupancy rate (all housing forms) 2.16 person / unit.

The changing household composition will affect the demand for different types of housing forms, especially as housing affordability becomes an issue.

For more information on the changing housing preferences and needs in the North Hill Communities, click here.

WHERE?

Where is growth and redevelopment encouraged?

Growth and redevelopment in established neighbourhoods helps ensure population levels can be maintained. A key ingredient of thriving communities with vibrant local shops, amenities and schools is having the local population needed to support them.

Calgary’s Municipal Development Plan encourages future population and job growth in specific areas of the city. These areas include Activity Centres, Main Streets, and Transit-Oriented Development areas which are intended to support higher density development, more diverse forms of housing, retail and commercial services, public and essential services, as well as amenities. These areas are also characterized by frequent and high-quality light rail and/or bus transit service.

To the meet the goals and objectives of the Municipal Development Plan and to maximize opportunities for people to choose to live and work in the established areas, growth must also occur outside of these specific areas, within our communities. This allows for a greater range of housing types to suit all ages, lifestyles and housing needs in a way that contributes to communities evolving overtime

The draft plan focuses the highest intensity of future growth in and around the area’s Main Streets, future station areas, and activity centres.

TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT
Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) areas are generally defined by a 600 metre radius around a transit station which represents an approximately 5-8 minute walking distance.

MAIN STREETS
Main Streets are great places to live, work or visit because a range of amenities, shops, restaurants are accessible in one stretch via a range of transportation options.

NEIGHBOURHOOD ACTIVITY CENTRES
Neighbourhood Activity Centres (NACs) are often located in the middle of a residential area and provide locals with access to local shops and amenities, often within walking distance.

ESTABLISHED AREAS
Redevelopment in these areas is a gradual process that occurs over a number of years and is guided not only by planning policy but also by market demand and people’s changing lifestyle preference and housing needs.

Within the North Hill Communities there are four Main Streets (16 Avenue, 4 Street NW, Edmonton Trail NE and Centre Street N), three future Green Line transit stations (16 Ave, 28 Ave and 40 Ave), the MAX Orange BRT on 16 Avenue, a number of Neighbourhood Activity Centres such as the cluster of facilities and schools around the Renfrew Aquatic and Recreation Centre and existing strip mall and commercial development at 10 Street NW and 20 Avenue NW and an important employment hub in the Greenview Industrial Area.

HOW?

How is a local area plan implemented?

Private building / investment
It is largely individual landowners and property owners who help implement the plan if/when they decide to build something new on their parcel.

When land owners decide to build something new, they will have to submit an application to the city for consideration.

Through the application review process, any infrastructure required to support the individual project (such as utility connections and sidewalk repair/replacement) is identified and paid for the developer. The local area plan will guide the review of future applications.

Public building / investment
Established areas continuously change and evolve. This change in communities, including changes in job and population levels, impacts the desired and required provision of publicly funded amenities and programs.

  • Project are generally considered and prioritized by City Administration and Council through The City’s business plans and budgets.
  • Citizen direction on needs and desires informs City of Calgary evaluations of required public infrastructure investment.

Through our public engagement process, public investment goals for the area as well as specific associated implementation options have been identified. City service lines will use the identified implementations options as input to inform future budget requests.

How was this local area plan created?

The City works together with local residents, landowners, businesses, builders/developers and other interested stakeholders – creating a plan through an iterative approach.

The City has been active in the North Hill Communities since September 2018 and has completed two previous phases of engagement to inform the draft plan.

The City has also been working with the North Hill Communities Working Group to help draft the plan and has completed six sessions. For more information on the working group, please click here.

To review a summary of feedback from previous engagement, please review these documents:

The project team also considered past input received through other projects that have occured in the area such as Green Line and Main Streets.

What have we heard from the community so far, and how was that considered in the draft plan?

Please refer to the summary of themes and how they were considered in the creation of the plan. Please note this document is still in development and was not ready at the time of launching engagement. Stay tuned for more content.

The image below is a visual summary of feedback received in phase two.


WHEN?

Project Next Steps

Following the close of phase three on December 8, The City will use the input provided to update the draft plan.

In January 2020, we will then meet with the working group to review the updated draft and collect further feedback. After this session the plan will be updated and the final proposed plan will be created.

The final proposed plan will be shared will the public prior to being shared with Committee and Council. Ensure you subscribe to email updates to be notified of the final proposed plan.

The final proposed plan will be presented to the Special Policy Committee on Planning & Urban Development in March 2020 and will be considered by Council for approval in April 2020.



THE DRAFT

The draft local area plan for the North Hill Communities, is still in a draft format. Based on feedback received in phase three, we will look to refine and finalize the final proposed plan.

The draft local area plan has been informed by the framework outlined in the proposed Guidebook for Great Communities. The local area plan and the Guidebook have been created to work in tandem together to guide future growth and redevelopment

The Guidebook also includes a number of development policies in chapter three, these policies will apply to the North Hill communities, and are not meant to be duplicated or repeated in the local area plan.

If you are reading the draft local area plan, and feel a policy may be missing, that could because it is contained in another City policy document such as the Guidebook or Municipal Development Plan. The local area plan is intended to only include local specific policies.

Please ensure you click through the each of the tabs here for further break out of the draft plan content. The URBAN FORM & SCALE tabs are helpful for interpretation of the mapping categories used in the draft.

The Draft Plan is comprised of the following documents:

URBAN FORM

Urban Form Classification System

The urban form classification system identifies and categorizes the purpose, general function and activity level of different parts of a community. The relationship between the resulting urban form categories helps local area plans to demonstrate how the different areas of a community relate to and support each other.

The urban form classification system is comprised of sixteen categories that direct future community form outcome. These have been applied in the North Hill Communities in the resulting Urban Form Map below.

Urban Form Map

Urban Form Definitions

The gallery and text below provides a high-level definition for the different urban form classifications. For more detail on these you can refer to pages 20 – 77 of the Guidebook for Great Communities.

Purposes identify the most common function, current and future, of an area and are organized under four primary categories: Neighbourhood, Parks and Open Space, Industrial and Regional Campus. These are based on broad categories of activities that are compatible and complementary.

General functions sub-categorize the purpose of an area in a community, and focus on the dominant type of activity that people would experience at the ground floor of a building from the public realm. For example in the Neighbourhood purpose there are two primary functions; commercial and housing.

Activity level references the anticipated activity generated by people in an area. In neighbourhood areas, this activity is generated by people moving in-and-out of buildings and interacting along the street. The street and buildings should be designed to enhance the at-grade experience in a manner that appropriately responds to the activity level. For parks and open space, activity level references the anticipated activity generated by people accessing and using the park, open space or facilities. The amenities and management of a park or open space should reflect the level of activity—either by providing appropriately scaled facilities and programming or managing the volume of users. There are three activity levels defined in the urban form classification system: major; minor; and local. Activity levels only apply to the urban form categories of Neighbourhood Commercial, Neighbourhood Housing and Civic and Recreation, and are expressed in relation to one another within a community rather than in absolute terms.

Policy modifiers are optional policy components that are used to tailor an urban form category to address specific situations in communities.

BUILDING SCALE

Scale Modifiers

Scale refers to the combination of height and massing of a structure. Scale modifiers are applied to urban form categories to indicate the general scale and anticipated human experience at the street level. The scales are grouped by compatible built forms with similar design standards to manage the experience of height and massing for people at the street level.

The Guidebook outlines five scale modifiers that apply to the Neighbourhood and Industrial Transition areas. Four of these modifiers have been used in the North Hill Communities scale map. When we applied scale, we considered the future anticipated activity level of an area to ensure that the scale will support enough intensity to make the anticipated activity level viable.

In general, many people are needed to support a retail area so larger scale buildings near high-activity areas will help to support their success, while an overly restricted building scale will reduce their viability. A variety of scales have been applied across the communities to provide opportunity and choice and contribute to the diversity of the North Hill Communities, map provided below.


BUILDING SCALE MAP

SCALE MODIFIER DEFINITIONS

Limited Scale

  • Buildings of three storeys or less.
  • Typically smaller individual building footprints.
  • Activity is ground oriented (units mostly have ground floor entrances or direct access).
Low Scale

  • Buildings of six storeys or less.
  • Usually buildings with stacked units and shared entries, often with a larger building footprint.
Mid Scale

  • Buildings of twelve storeys or less.
  • Buildings typically step back after the street wall height.
  • Usually larger buildings with shared entries and elevators that are mostly located on larger sites.
High Scale

  • Buildings of twenty-six storeys or less.
  • Typically tower and podium or point tower forms

Refer to the gallery below for further examples of scale.

SUPPORTING GROWTH OBJECTIVES

Supporting Growth Goals, Objectives, and Implementation Options

Through chapter three of the local area plan we look to identify what physical and social investments are needed to support the growth vision.

The below chart illustrates growth objectives and a list of supporting implementations options identified to support the objective.

What is a supporting growth objective? To support the vision set out in Chapter 1 of this Plan, we have included supporting growth objectives to identify where and how growth can be supported at the local level. The objectives represent the future or desired result that the plan commits to achieve. They apply at the community-wide level (i.e. they’re not site specific) and provide benefit to more than one resident. The objectives are long-term, durable and are intended to be actionable.

What is an implementation option? Implementation options have been identified by stakeholders through public engagement conducted during the drafting of this Plan. As noted in Chapter 3, these actions represent steps community stakeholders identified to achieve the support growth objectives of the Plan. The list below represents a snap shot in time based on feedback collected to date. It is expected that the list will be updated based on further engagement as part of this project as well as projects in the future. In addition, this list will be updated as actions are implemented and additional actions are identified. The items listed here will be used by City Service Lines and other departments as inputs and consideration into future budget decisions. The local area plan will not implement these actions but the list will be used to inform future budget allocations.


North Hill Communities Supporting Growth ObjectiveImplementation Options
Celebrate, care for, and, where appropriate protect, the heritage of the communities
  • Preserve Tuxedo School and consider adding residential uses

Recognize and support community identity and character through investment in public and private space including such things as community beautification, signage, wayfinding, and public art.
  • Explore and realize opportunities for public art in public space or as part of private development.
Improve and enhance existing community association buildings and related facilities within the North Hill Communities

  • Improve Mount Pleasant Community Hall and Pool
Improve safety and comfort in existing parks and, where feasible, support a broader range of complementary uses that cater to diverse groups of users.
  • Improve lighting in key natural areas such as along the McHugh Bluff from the Curling Club up to Crescent Road NW.
  • Improve Tuxedo School Park and playground
  • Improve Munro Park
  • Add amenities to Confederation Park such as outdoor skating rink, water fountains, washrooms, tennis courts, bike/bmx park, bike paths and outdoor fitness.
  • Explore the feasibility of adding a restaurant amenity to Crescent Park
  • Acquire the former Highland Park Golf Course lands and turn it into open space
  • Improve park maintenance along east side of 10 Street NW
  • Improve the Mount Pleasant Arts Centre
  • Provide more off-leash dog parks
  • Provide more water parks
  • Provide more land in the area for parks
  • Provide a fitness park at the McHugh Bluff
  • Provide additional tree plantings, benches, bathrooms in parks

Improve and enhance existing public recreation facilities
  • Improve Renfrew Aquatic and Recreation Centre with combined facilities
Improve the quality of the pedestrian realm along Main Streets, station areas, and activity centres
  • Improve the pedestrian realm, connectivity, and accessibility of 16 Avenue N by providing wider sidewalks, tree planting and dedicated pedestrian overpasses
  • Beautification of the street environment generally
  • Beautification of Centre Street N and Edmonton Trail NE
  • Provide raised boulevard planters and public realm partnership improvements
  • Create walking routes adjacent to 16 Avenue and improve connectivity
  • Improve sidewalks and public realm on 16 Avenue N (do not wait for developers to build it)
  • Explore opportunities for private entities to construct or finance boulevard improvements.
  • 4 Street and 26 Avenue NW power lines that are in front of retail could be relocated underground
  • Address inconsistency of 16 Avenue side walk materials, widths, etc. (including the timing of when these upgrades may occur)
  • Provide pedestrian realm improvements on 16 Avenue N (slower traffic, on-street parking)

Improve pedestrian connections and complete missing links between Main Streets, station areas, activity centres, parks and natural areas
  • Improve the pathway connection at the north end of 1 Street NE
  • Improve the pathway connections between Highland Park to Greenview
  • Provide pathway connections between Winston Heights and Nose Creek

Explore opportunities for additional on-street parking along Main Streets
  • Add all-day street parking on Centre Street N
  • Add off-peak parking on 16th Avenue N
  • Add all-day street parking on Edmonton Trail NE

Improve transit connections inside and outside of the North Hill Communities
  • Invest in high-frequency, primary transit such as Green Line LRT and BRT
Improve safety, connectivity, and accessibility for all modes of Transportation
  • Repair 13 Street NE, 13A Street, Phair Avenue NE and St Georges Drive NE.
  • Upgrade pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure on 2 Street NW
  • Provide better integration of cycling network and driving lanes; balance the interests of different road users (no reduced volume or winding driving lanes)
  • Improve traffic calming around Renfrew Pool and Recreation Centre
  • Improve connectivity across 16 Avenue N for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Improve connections between Bridgeland and Renfrew
  • Prioritize traffic calming in key areas
  • Provide pedestrian connectivity improvements (North Hill, SAIT, Jubilee areas are good examples)
  • Create pedestrian routes within the community and include better infrastructure and maintenance

Expand the cycle network across the plan area, provide improved connections and complete missing links between Main Streets, station areas, activity centres, parks, and natural areas.
  • Add a cycle track on Centre Street N
  • Improve pedestrian realm and bike lanes on 24 Avenue N
  • Add bike connection to Confederation Park at 27 Avenue NW
  • Extend bike lane on Edmonton Trail NE
  • Add 8 Avenue cycle track (from Centre Street to 19 Street east)
  • Connecting missing pathways and bike trails from Edmonton Trail to Confederation Park

Connect and enhance the east-west cycle connections to destinations within the plan area and beyond such the University of Calgary and SAIT
  • Add bike lane to 20 Avenue N
  • Create cycling infrastructure linking east to west to major institutions like the UofC
  • Add bike lane to 19 Avenue NW
  • Improve pedestrian realm and bike lanes on 24 Avenue N

Support and expand the tree canopy throughout the plan area
  • Include trees along 8 Avenue NE with cycling infrastructure improvements
  • 32 Avenue N, Centre Street N, and Edmonton Trail NE - trees need to be better pruned and cared for
  • Add trees to 8 Avenue NE
  • Provide tree replacement issues throughout the community
  • Increase tree plantings along sidewalks throughout the community



PROVIDE YOUR INPUT

We want to hear your thoughts on the draft plan! Please click through the tabs below to share your thoughts on the various plan sections. This will be open for comments until December 8.

DRAFT VISION & GUIDING PRINCIPLES

The Vision

The North Hill Communities are a collection of some of Calgary’s first street-car suburbs. They are historic, vibrant, and accessible communities where a range of people choose to live, do business, and play. As the North Hill Communities continue to evolve, they will build upon their rich history and eclectic neighborhood character. Through high-quality, people focused development, the North Hill Communities will accommodate a diverse population, enhanced amenities, strong transportation connections, mix of housing types, vibrant main streets, and an accessible network of parks and open spaces.

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Guiding Principles

Through engagement in phase one, The City and Working Group developed Guiding Principles for the project. Click here to review the results of phase one engagement.

The Guiding Principles have been listed below, with a response of how these have been addressed and considered in the draft plan. Please review each principle and provide a response that reflects how you feel about the statement "The local area plan has appropriately addressed and considered this guiding principle." If you disagree with the statement, we would like to know why.

Guiding Principle #1:

Maximize the opportunity for people to choose to live in close proximity to varied mobility options that safely and conveniently reach a diversity of destinations both within and outside the North Hill Communities.

How has this been addressed in the plan:

  • The draft plan focuses the highest intensity of future growth in and around the area’s Main Streets, future station areas, and activity centres.
  • These areas are currently well-served by varied transportation options including pedestrian, cycling, and public transit connections.
  • Through investment such as the recent MAX Orange BRT as well as Green Line LRT, mobility options in these areas are expected to improve.

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement.

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Guiding Principle #2

Recognize and enhance open spaces, the public realm, the urban forest/tree canopy, natural systems, and the connections between them

How has this been addressed in the draft plan?

  • The draft plan utilizes Parks, Civic, and Recreation urban form categories to apply the appropriate policies for individual parks. For example, Confederation Park and the Renfrew Athletics Fields and Aquatic Centre are identified as major, recognizing the important role they play for Calgarians beyond just the North Hill Communities. Other parks such as Munro Park are identified as minor reflecting their role in providing recreation opportunities for local area residents.
  • The draft plan also includes supporting policy that encourages retention and replacement of the tree canopy, particularly on heritage boulevards

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement.

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Guiding Principle #3

Foster vibrant mixed-use main streets that support local businesses and are in turn supported by diverse housing options on tree-lined streets.

How has this been addressed in the plan:

  • The draft plan recognizes opportunities to accommodate additional growth and redevelopment on and around the area’s Main Streets. Increased population in these areas specifically, as well as in the surrounding communities, will help support local businesses.
  • Policies included in the plan focus active, pedestrian-focused frontages on key portions of the area’s Main Streets

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement

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Guiding Principle #4

Build on and strengthen existing clusters of small-scale neighbourhood shops and community amenities outside of the main streets.

How has this been addressed in the draft plan?

  • The draft plan identifies and includes policies for neighbourhood activity centres in the plan area such as along 20 Avenue NW at 14 Street NW and 10 Street NW.
  • The policies seek to improve the public realm in these areas and create safe, welcoming, pedestrian environments that provide more locally focused shops and businesses within the North Hill Communities.

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement.

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Guiding Principle #5

Enable the creation of housing that fosters accessibility and diversity among people, ages, incomes, and household types.

How has this been addressed in the draft plan?

  • The draft plan aims to provide a range of housing types that can meet the needs of a diversity of people, ages, and household types.
  • The draft plan encourages the development of a broad mix of housing types, from single-detached, semi-detached to rowhousing and other forms of low-scale homes within primarily residential areas. In addition, other forms and scales of housing, such as apartments, are envisioned along the area’s Main Streets, station areas, and activity centres

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement.

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Guiding Principle #6

Support the ongoing vitality of the Greenview Industrial Area and its role as an important employment and innovation area.

How has this been addressed in the draft plan?

  • The draft plan recognizes the importance of Greenview Industrial as an employment area for both the North Hill Communities and the wider city.
  • Policies within the draft plan support the ongoing, eclectic mix of commercial and industrial uses in this area.
  • In addition, the draft plan applies industrial transition policies along the interface between Greenview Industrial and Highland Park and Winston Heights/Mountview that allow for both light industrial as well as residential uses.

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement

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Guiding Principle #7

Encourage resilience in the built environment that allows adaptability to a changing society, economy, and climate.

How has this been addressed in the draft plan?

  • The draft plan aligns with the environmental, sustainable, economic objectives of the Municipal Development Plan.
  • The draft plan directs growth and higher intensity development to activity centres, Main Streets, and station areas while also encouraging continued incremental redevelopment within residential areas. Orienting population and job growth in strategic locations and at intensities that support transit and local businesses and services that are easily accessible by various modes of travel (walking, biking, etc.). Overall, the plan encourages population and job growth in the area which helps ensure optimized public infrastructure, facilities and investments

Choose a response that reflects how you feel about the above statement.

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DRAFT MAPS

Map 3: Urban Form

Map 3: Urban Form identifies and categorizes the purpose, general function and activity levels of different parts of a community. These categories are focused on the street experience and not related to building scale. The map demonstrates how the different areas of a community relate to and support each other.

The urban form map is in the gallery below for further review and background on the urban form classification system has been provided above to aid your interpretation. After you have reviewed the draft urban form map, please provide your comments below. Review the image of the Urban Form Map below or review and zoom in on the PDF here.

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Map 4: Building Scale

Scale refers to the combination of height and massing of a structure. The scale map identifies the general scale and anticipated human experience at the street level. Scale has been applied to ensure enough intensity to make the future anticipated activity level viable.

It is important to note that the land use bylaw will supplement building scale modifiers by more specifically regulating height, floor area ratios and transition.

The building scale map is provided in the gallery below or you can review and zoom in on the PDF here. Background on the scale modifiers have been included in the tabs above and will aid your interpretation of the scale categories.

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IMPLEMENTATION OPTIONS

Further background on this section has been provided under the tab above "SUPPORTING GROWTH OBJECTIVES".

Please review the above information and provide your answers to the list of questions below.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Celebrate, care for, and, where appropriate protect, the heritage of the communities

Implementation Option:

  • Preserve Tuxedo School and consider adding residential uses
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Recognize and support community identity and character through investment in public and private space including such things as community beautification, signage, wayfinding, and public art.

Implementation Option:

  • Explore and realize opportunities for public art in public space or as part of private development.
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve and enhance existing community association buildings and related facilities within the North Hill Communities

Implementation Option:

  • Improve Mount Pleasant Community Hall and Pool
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve safety and comfort in existing parks and, where feasible, support a broader range of complementary uses that cater to diverse groups of users.

Implementation Options:

  • Improve lighting in key natural areas such as along the McHugh Bluff from the Curling Club up to Crescent Road NW.
  • Improve Tuxedo School Park and playground
  • Improve Munro Park
  • Add amenities to Confederation Park such as outdoor skating rink, water fountains, washrooms, tennis courts, bike/bmx park, bike paths and outdoor fitness.
  • Explore the feasibility of adding a restaurant amenity to Crescent Park
  • Acquire the former Highland Park Golf Course lands and turn it into open space
  • Improve park maintenance along east side of 10 Street NW
  • Improve the Mount Pleasant Arts Centre
  • Provide more off-leash dog parks
  • Provide more water parks
  • Provide more land in the area for parks
  • Provide a fitness park at the McHugh Bluff
  • Provide additional tree plantings, benches, bathrooms in parks
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve and enhance existing public recreation facilities

Implementation Option
  • Improve Renfrew Aquatic and Recreation Centre with combined facilities
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve the quality of the pedestrian realm along Main Streets, station areas, and activity centres.

Implementation Options:

  • Improve the pedestrian realm, connectivity, and accessibility of 16 Avenue N by providing wider sidewalks, tree planting and dedicated pedestrian overpasses
  • Beautification of the street environment generally
  • Beautification of Centre Street N and Edmonton Trail NE
  • Provide raised boulevard planters and public realm partnership improvements
  • Create walking routes adjacent to 16 Avenue and improve connectivity
  • Improve sidewalks and public realm on 16 Avenue N (do not wait for developers to build it)
  • Explore opportunities for private entities to construct or finance boulevard improvements.
  • 4 Street and 26 Avenue NW power lines that are in front of retail could be relocated underground
  • Address inconsistency of 16 Avenue side walk materials, widths, etc. (including the timing of when these upgrades may occur)
  • Provide pedestrian realm improvements on 16 Avenue N (slower traffic, on-street parking)
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve pedestrian connections and complete missing links between Main Streets, station areas, activity centres, parks and natural areas.

Implementation Options:

  • Improve the pathway connection at the north end of 1 Street NE
  • Improve the pathway connections between Highland Park to Greenview
  • Provide pathway connections between Winston Heights and Nose Creek
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Explore opportunities for additional on-street parking along Main Streets

Implementation Options:

  • Add all-day street parking on Centre Street N
  • Add off-peak parking on 16th Avenue N
  • Add all-day street parking on Edmonton Trail NE
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective:

Improve transit connections inside and outside of the North Hill Communities

Implementation Options:

  • Invest in high-frequency, primary transit such as Green Line LRT and BRT
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Improve safety, connectivity, and accessibility for all modes of Transportation

Implementation Options:

  • Repair 13 Street NE, 13A Street, Phair Avenue NE and St Georges Drive NE.
  • Upgrade pedestrian and cyclist infrastructure on 2 Street NW
  • Provide better integration of cycling network and driving lanes; balance the interests of different road users (no reduced volume or winding driving lanes)
  • Improve traffic calming around Renfrew Pool and Recreation Centre
  • Improve connectivity across 16 Avenue N for pedestrians and cyclists
  • Improve connections between Bridgeland and Renfrew
  • Prioritize traffic calming in key areas
  • Provide pedestrian connectivity improvements (North Hill, SAIT, Jubilee areas are good examples)
  • Create pedestrian routes within the community and include better infrastructure and maintenance
You have 255 characters left.

North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Connect and enhance the east-west cycle connections to destinations within the plan area and beyond such the University of Calgary and SAIT


Implementation Options

  • Add bike lane to 20 Avenue N
  • Create cycling infrastructure linking east to west to major institutions like the UofC
  • Add bike lane to 19 Avenue NW
  • Improve pedestrian realm and bike lanes on 24 Avenue N
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Expand the cycle network across the plan area, provide improved connections and complete missing links between Main Streets, station areas, activity centres, parks, and natural areas.

Implementation Options:

  • Add a cycle track on Centre Street N
  • Improve pedestrian realm and bike lanes on 24 Avenue N
  • Add bike connection to Confederation Park at 27 Avenue NW
  • Extend bike lane on Edmonton Trail NE
  • Add 8 Avenue cycle track (from Centre Street to 19 Street east)
  • Connecting missing pathways and bike trails from Edmonton Trail to Confederation Park
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North Hill Communities Supporting Growth Objective: Support and expand the tree canopy throughout the plan area

Implementation Options:

  • Include trees along 8 Avenue NE with cycling infrastructure improvements
  • 32 Avenue N, Centre Street N, and Edmonton Trail NE - trees need to be better pruned and cared for
  • Add trees to 8 Avenue NE
  • Provide tree replacement issues throughout the community
  • Increase tree plantings along sidewalks throughout the community
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HOW ARE WE DOING?

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