ABOUT THE PROJECT

Calgary’s Civic Sport Policy was endorsed by the sport community and approved by Council in 2005 as a means to grow, foster and encourage sport and sport opportunities in Calgary.

It has been ten years since Council first approved the policy and now we feel that it is an appropriate time to evaluate the progress to date, as well as, to seek a better understanding of:

  • Issues and barriers to achieving the desired impact of the Policy.
  • The City’s role (municipal role) within the broader sport delivery system.
  • How the City works with its partners to achieve Council’s priorities.
The City has hired Western Management Consultants to help us benchmark, reach out to stakeholder groups and citizens, and prepare future-state recommendations.

YOUR INPUT

Thanks to everyone who provided feedback. The opportunity to provide input is now closed.

In this latest round of engagement, a second version of 'what we heard' was made available. We asked the public to review the report and provide any overarching feedback, as well as feedback on two highlights from the what we heard report, the "Key Outcome" statement and six "Supporting Principles".

To date, we have conducted benchmarking, surveys, interviews and focused discussions with individuals and organizations representing a broad range of stakeholders including sport, education, health, diverse communities, social services and all levels of government.


Key Outcome

The statement below was crated based on feedback from a range of stakeholders through the Civic Sport Policy Review. This statement is intended to represent the intended ‘key outcome’ identified by stakeholders during the Civic Sport Policy Review.


“Maintain, Increase, and Sustain New and Existing Participants in Sport and Physical Activity, for Life”


Does this statement resonate? Why/why not? Is there something missing?

14 December, 2016

Chris says:

“Leveraging sport engagement as one of the ways to get more Calgarians, more active, more often.”

8 December, 2016

PJ says:

“The word maintain seems redundant. Does the statement lose any power impact if it is dropped from the front end?”

7 December, 2016

Lynn Bowers says:

“Seems thorough, democratic. 'Sport hub' concept will fit with this.”

5 December, 2016

Sandra F says:

“Our taxes should sustain all sports equally. Female sports have been left on the side lines, specifically ringette for ice allocation.”

5 December, 2016

mg says:

“Great!”

4 December, 2016

Don says:

“Seems to me that engage should be included somewhere in the statement.”

30 November, 2016

Ringette dad says:

“Nice statement, no backbone!! Bureaucratic success, but no "real" difference. Like bragging that Deerfoot is a major successful expressway!”

29 November, 2016

Karly says:

“To put it in simple terms it is to wordy, to corporate. Needs to be simpler and more to the point.”

29 November, 2016

Anne B says:

“The statement is just words unless all ice sports are given access to ice not just hockey”

29 November, 2016

Patricia Jaroslawski says:

“It's a nice statement, but has no practical value with certain sports such as hockey owning an inordinate proportion of athletic resources”

29 November, 2016

Erika Earle says:

“Basis based on past use of hockey ice allocations need to change. Optimization of resoures & fair access is key. Ringette needs more access.”

29 November, 2016

Heather says:

“I agree with this statement and like the fact it covers both new and existing participants and also encompasses being active for life.”

28 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“#2 - what about "Drafting a sports city"? or "Come be part of the home team"? or "Come play for the home team"? simpler is better.”

28 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“Very corporate-jargony. Glazes me over. What about "Active play for an active city"? Simpler is better.”

Supporting Principles

Supporting the 'key outcome', the six supporting principles listed below were drafted based on feedback from stakeholders during the Civic Sport Policy Review to achieve the key outcome and prevent us from trying to “do it all”:

1. Skill development as a means to lifelong participation through increased confidence and self-esteem.

2. Balance the provision of programs for adults as well as children and youth.

3. Expanded definition of sport which avoids the exclusion of “smaller” sports.

4. Design programs, facilities, and delivery that “look like me” –a reflection of the diversity of participants.

5. Maximize the use and utilization of City and partner operated facilities.

6. Make Calgary a “sport city” of active and engaged Calgarians.


Do these principles resonate? Why/why not? Is there something missing?

14 December, 2016

Chris says:

“1-Physical Literacy 2-LTAD (active throughout lifespan at all levels) 3&4-Inclusive & diverse programs & facilities 5-Optimize”

4 December, 2016

Don says:

“ Don't like "look like me" in #4. Why not have, Design programs, facilities, and delivery that reflects the diversity of all participants?”

30 November, 2016

Aron Shapiro says:

“Yes these principles are great. Balanced ice time for ringette is needed.”

29 November, 2016

Miranda Anderson says:

“Parallel construction enhances resonance. Start Principles with a verb and avoid passive voice. This would address "corp speak" problems.”

29 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“#5 sorry if last one sounded a little rude but your system only lets me enter 140 characters at a time. Good luck with the project.”

29 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“#4 reading lines that feel like a corporate boardroom is probably the best way to get me to go to sleep instead of do something active”

29 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“#3 what about "4. Diverse programs for a diverse crowd" "5. Get the most out of what we have" "6. Sports for a Sporty city"”

29 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“#2 what about "1. Build skills for lifelong growth". "2. Grown ups get to play too!" 3. "Small sports matter too"”

28 November, 2016

MrNoName says:

“To me they don't because they're too corporate-jargon. It feels like reading a 40 page instruction manual before lacing up a pair of skates.”

28 November, 2016

Doug Lennox says:

“No they do not resonate. Why would having people "look like me" be something the city should be concerned about? Is this segregated sports?”

Feedback Form

The survey form is now closed. Thanks for your contributions.


NEXT STEPS

At each step in the process, we are reporting what we’ve heard. Following this round of public input, a final “what we heard” report will be produced and posted here.

The Civic Sport Policy Review "what we heard" report is one piece of work that will Inform the development of a refreshed Civic Sport Policy.

Your feedback will go directly to the Civic Sport Policy project team, and will be taken into consideration as the final policy is shaped.

Other factors that will inform the Civic Sport Policy include:

  • Research within Calgary Recreation
  • Civic Sport Policy General Population Study
  • Federal and Provincial sport policies, strategies, research and best practices
  • Alignment with existing council policies, plans and priorities as well as considerations of any limitations to implementation.